BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

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Sunday, August 2, 2009

question 153: Does the same apply to TV? There's so much to watch and so much of it's bad!

This was a comment/question in response to yesterday's question. And the answer is a little different. The answer in TV is: YES definitely. That said, you don't have to TIVO and watch every episode of every show (except 24. YOU MUST watch every episode). But, you have to watch just enough to know the genre, pace, characters, style, etc. (pertaining to your classification).

If you're a camera operator and you get called in to day play on Desperate Housewives, it's going to be a very different style of operating than 24 (yes, that's 2 plugs for my favorite show). An actor going in to audition for House is different than auditioning for MadMen.

Even in reality, there's a difference between editing The Housewives of Orange County and Top Chef. Like yesterday's post, it's research. It's your job to know what you're talking about in your area.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.thegreenlightcoachblog.com

question 152: I work in movies but I don't go see movies. Is that bad?

I suppose it depends on a few factors. I recently coached an editor who spends most of his time in a dark room editing movies and in his spare time wants to do something else. Can you blame him? That said, you are the CEO of your company and you have to make the best decisions for your company. If the CEO of McDonald's wasn't staying current on what was going on in the fast food industry, he wouldn't have kept it competitive. Now McD's serves coffee drinks and "healthy choices." So, do you want to be up to date and current in your industry?

I love romantic comedies, but to me, the classics are Pretty Woman, Working Girl, and While You Were Sleeping. When some of my clients hear this, they reprimand me for missing the classics of their generations. If I'm going to continue to market myself as the "romantic comedy girl," I have to at least give these older classics a chance (even though nothing can beat Pretty Woman!)

Unless you have a specific reason, like the editor, why wouldn't you support the people and the medium that keeps you working?

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com