BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

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Wednesday, March 31, 2010

entertainment industry coach Question 392: What kind of gift is appropriate for someone who introduced me to someone who hired me?



That’s up to you. How much money are you making on the job? What relationship do you have with the person who introduced you? Gift cards, spa certificates, something specific that the person who introduced you likes and probably wouldn’t buy for his/herself.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

entertainment industry coach Question 391: Resume question:

“I'm now asked to either email or fax a resume if it involves a production office. I usually choose the fax because I figure several people might see my name, recognize it, pass it around and hopefully it will get to the DP. In my efforts to go green I'm trying to shrink my resume to take less paper. But I've got lots of credits (thanks in a big way to you!!!) and I don't want to make it too small. I am emailing it to many places because they only offer that option so length is no problem -- any tips on making it stand out? I'm sending it in PDF format rather in the body of the email -- is that the best way?”

First, cover both bases by faxing the 1 pager, then sending an email saying, “In an effort to go green, I’ve faxed you my short resume as requested. Attached is the longer version.”

Second, if you want to stand out write in big letters (or in an email in big red letters) Requested by/Referred by (insert the name of person you know on the production). That’s of course if you have a referral or if it’s been requested. Do you 6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon to find out someone connected to your submission.

And third, when sending a PDF, do both, in the body of the email and the attachment.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Monday, March 29, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 390: How do I get into doing voiceovers?

I get this question from many actors and some non-actors with great voices. Voice over work is one of the more challenging areas of entertainment to break into. It's a tightly knit group and they try to keep it that way. Many working voice over artists own their own home studio so they can audition from their home and email it to their agent or a specific advertising agency. Some even do the jobs from home.

Voice over artists have marketing materials such as a website, and a voice over CD. There are different areas of work, such as commercials, cartoons, video games, greeting cards and animated movies.

I wish someone would re-do the voice on the awful garage ticket machines. That voice gives me the creeps.

Do your research on the voice over industry. Have informational interviews with successful voice over artists and agents who represent voice over artists.

While many think of it as a supplemental income job to their entertainment career, you will quickly learn that it is just as much a full-time business as anything else.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Sunday, March 28, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 389:As a coach/industry person, what's a mistake you made that I can learn from?

I think all of our lessons are different, so I would have to know what you're doing to be able to advise you on what to continue and what's not as effective. But, you did ask me personally, so I'll tell you. Maybe it's just because I'm feeling nostalgic because I'm home and seeing friends whom I haven't seen in over a decade, but I'd say the biggest mistake I've made is putting TOO much emphasis on my work.

Follow up is the make or break of business relationships, so you can learn from that. I do a great job with following up with business contacts, however, when it comes to following up with personal relationships or taking the time out to vacation and see friends, I haven't done a good job at all.

The good news is, now that I see what I'm missing, I can change it. I've always taken relaxing spa-type vacations as opposed to coming back East to see my friends. I think we can mix the two. Once a year, plan a 4-day spa vacation (I can probably stay longer but they all have kids) so we can all see each other.

There is something SO special about being with old friends; reminiscing and sharing how everyone's lives have grown, the good the challenges... it's invaluable.

That's a mistake I made, and I plan to change it. You can learn from this, or you can apply it to your business by evaluating how you follow up with work friends/collegues.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoach.com

Saturday, March 27, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 388: Is it better to pursue multiple areas of entertainment or focus on just one?

That really depends on you, your talent, and your ability to manage your time. There are plenty of slashers ( / / / ) out there. People run into trouble when they become Jack of all trades, master of none. But look at how many talented people out there act, direct, write, produce, shoot, etc.

If they can do it, maybe you can too. Only you can tell if you are mastering the arts or spreading yourself too thin.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Friday, March 26, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 387: What's the best way to find out about jobs without an agent?

Here's what most people do: They look through the trades or online and "cold" submit. The problem with that is, the people who get the cold submissions are being bombarded, because if you found it, so did many others.

You've heard me say it over and over!!!! Contacts CONTACTS CONTACTS!!! You are going to get jobs through the people you know. An agent isn't the answer to getting you work. They get +10% because YOU are 100% responsible for your career. Research what jobs are out there and then do your 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon to figure out who you know who knows somone who is connected to that production.

Network, research, preparation, follow through, professionalism. All ways to get work without an agent.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit http://www.TheGreenlightCoach.com

Thursday, March 25, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 386: I submitted for a show, when I show up for the audition should I bring my material with me?

I was aksed this question last night during a radio interview. The young lady had sent in a picture & video for a show and wanted to know if on the call back she needed to bring these materials with her.

My advice is, it's better to be overprepared. Bring the picture and video with you. If they ask for it, you will show that you are prepared and professional. If they don't ask for it, then they don't need it.

You will feel more confident going in for an interview or an audition when you are as prepared as possible.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.thegreenlightcoach.com

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 385: do you suggest living in one state and flying to LA to work?

I don't make any suggestions when it comes to people's personal lives. If you can easily make that commute (get to work on time, get flights when needed, not have flight delay problems) and have enough contacts that you get called to work in LA when you live somewhere else, then it's a decision for you to make.

There are union rules about living in one place and working in another, so be sure to research those. You also have to consider the types of projects you'll be working on; how long will they keep you away from home and where will you stay, how often might you have to commute, etc.

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 384:Will Bret Michaels win the Apprentice?

Great you had to ask this on a day that I just gave two seminars in NY, and now they're going to tune into this blog and wonder what the heck is going on? So, to get them up to speed... ever since the Bear Grylls question a few months back, I agreed to answer a few kooky questions every once in a while.

If I were a betting man, I'd say, No. Bret will not win. But because I don't bet and I am not a man, I will so, yes. He rocks! And I had a door poster of him over my bed in college, which is a sure sign that he was meant to win the Celebrity Apprentice.

Y'all know I'm SO jetlagged, right? I'm going to wake up tomorrow and wonder who hyjacked my blog!

Monday, March 22, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 384: What should someone who is 12 and wants to be an actress do?

Well, if you don't live in Los Angeles (which I can tell she does not), use your "kid power." What's kid power? Most people LOVE to help a kid with drive. Make a list of actresses, actors, directors, and producers that you would like to one day work with. For example: Steven Spielberg often talks about how he was directing movies in his back yard as a kid. Find people like him and reach out to people in a letter. Tell them how old you are and what you're doing now to pursue your dream. Tell them where you live and ask them for advice on what more you can be doing right now. If you plan to go to college, ask them for advice on which colleges to consider and what you can be doing now for extra curricular activities to help you get in. Explain that you don't plan to pursue acting as a job until you're finished with your education, but in the mean time would like to build relationships with mentors so when you do move to NY or LA, you'll be ready and educated on the business side of the industry.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Sunday, March 21, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 383:What is the most important concept(s) you wished you could get across to your clients from the beginning?

The actual question read in it's entirety:

"As a coach, you must come across similar questions, situations, and attitudes. What is the most important concept(s) you wished you could get across to your clients from the beginning that would help them mostly."
GRRRRREAT question! Considering 9.8 out of 10 clients of mine who have been in the industry 10+ years say, "I wish I had you when I first started out," I would say the most important concepts are:
1. DON'T TRY TO DO IT ALONE!

2. If you have little or no business, sales, & marketing training, investing in it is equally if not more important than spending money on getting better at your craft. Because you can be the most talented and skilled person, but without an exceptional understanding of the business, you're just one in a million.

3. Belief in yourself/confidence is essential to your success.

4. Recognize that the top 10% who make it, are doing more than you know, therefore, you must learn what they know if you want to make it.

5. Every job has it's pros and cons. Focusing on the things you can't control and complaining to people who can't do anything to help you change your situation will hurt you. Therefore, find ways to maintain financial, emotional, and creative stability.

6. Be very aware of the 5 people closest to you; their level of success, how much money they make, and their attitude.

That covers the big ones for now. I could probably go on for hours. Maybe I'll do a part two.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Saturday, March 20, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 382: What current celebrities have you coached or managed that are in the acting business
?

First off, I don't manage anyone. I'm an entertainment industry career coach. I don't know how other coaches operate, but my client list is confidential. I have testimonials and press where my clients mention me, but I don't share their information with anyone. I know some coaches do, to promote their business, but my clients promote me so I don't do that kind of marketing.

Perhaps you're just wondering about my credentials, if I'm coaching people who are working and recognizable and the answer is yes. I've worked with Oscar and Emmy winners, people "fresh off the bus," and everyone in between. I've coached over 1000 people and that number grows every month. There isn't an obstacle I haven't found a solution for thus far, and should that day come, I'll use all of my resources to find an answer.

As great as it is to have celebrity clients (mostly because they understand how important following through with our work is, and therefore see the payoff faster) it's equally as great to work with someone unknown and watch them grow to celebrity status.

So I apologize if you were hoping for same name-dropping, but you've come to the wrong coach.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

The Greenlight Coach on the radio! Call in to the show!!!

Hey every one,
Light up the call boards in support of my radio appearance on:

Robert Galinsky's Reality Wanted
Wednesday March 24th 6-8pm ET 3-5pm PT
I'LL BE ON AT 7:30pm ET

Call 877 CHAT 212

Call-in, Interact and Listen Live at RealityWanted.com/radio

Would love to hear from you guys & gals on the radio

Friday, March 19, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 381: How do I capitalize on a current project when I'm off to work on another?

A-List problems. I love them! This is what I was asked by my client tonight after we watched the fabulous movie starring John Hamm and Josh Lucus, that he had produced and DPd. You see, he did such a GREAT job producing this film, that he's been hired to produce a slate of movies in Louisiana and he leaves on Tuesday. His film, STOLEN, is playing currently at the Laemmle Sunset 5. The more people who go, the longer it will stay in the theater. It was such a good movie. The acting was superb, the story heart-wrenching. If you live in in Los Angeles you should go see this movie!

So let me count.... that was 7 lines I just wrote promoting Andy Steinman and his wonderful work (now that's 8) Here's his IMDB link: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0826150/ (9) The link to his movie facebook fan page http://www.facebook.com/pages/STOLEN/315537805072?ref=ts (10) and the link to buy your tickets from the theater http://www.laemmle.com/viewtheatre.php?date=03192010&thid=2 (11)

Hence, the answer to the question is: HAVE YOUR FANS PROMOTE FOR YOU.
If you're a camera operator who wants work, but the DP who hires you isn't working, start a marketing campaign for the DP. If you want to stay on peoples' radar when you're off working, have other people promoting you.

While Andy is out of town working, as he keeps me posted on his successes, I'll be happy to promote him on my social media sites, in my blog, etc. If he has 20 other people doing that... he's creating buzz and you can too.

In addition to Andy, I'd also like to congratulate camera crew members, Boris Price, Nate Havens, Matt Mosher, and wonderful Still Photographer Jessica Brooks, who also worked on the project!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Thursday, March 18, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 380: What's the end credit title for person that posts & updates media to official, social & blog sites

I'm going to have to defer to my readers, because as of now, I'm not aware of an official "union" title for that. In the indie non-union world, anything goes. But I'm sure since it's becoming a big part of the marketing department there is a title out there somewhere. So, readers... please chime in and help a filmmaker (and a career coach) out on this one. Thanks!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 379: How do I avoid being a networking fool?

Well he didn't exactly say that. He was far more eloquent: When I am at a party or industry event, and I want to say hi to / network with someone important, I don't know when to cut in / interrupt. I stand there and wait, not wanting to be rude, but then I feel like I am hovering. As soon as I get ten seconds with the person, someone interrupts us ("What's up, dude!"), and I am left feeling unimportant and foolish.

What I told him, in a personal email is that he really needs to take my 5 Keys to Your Success at a Networking Event Seminar. The reason being is because, I can tell you what to do, but until you are practicing the exercises (and in my seminars it's a safe environment) and really get the timing and your wording right, it's still going to be intimidating.

Therefore I invite all of you to sign up for my FREE newsletter (see link below) because I tell you my schedule and when and where I will be giving that particular seminar for free.

But to give you a little written help, it's all about confidence and realizing that the difference between you and the "important person" are the opportunities that he/she had. As soon as you take people off the pedestal and recognize that you have something important to say that will enrich their lives to know, conversations will happen naturally.

In my Triple Your Contacts Doing What You Love product (also available on my site, lots of promotion in this blog because this is a big issue for masses of people and I want you to know I have solutions for you) I cover a lot of what goes on in my seminar, while tying it to the things you love to do. In addition, I give you a list of icebreakers to help get into the conversation... none of which include "what's your sign?"

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Entertainment industry coach question 378:Am I too old for a mentor?

His question went into a little more detail that may be helpful to many of you:
I'm 43 years old. I know a few directors whom I think would welcome a protege. Am I too old to ask them to mentor me? I don't want to make a fool of myself!

The answer is: No, as long as you have more to learn, you're never too old. The question is, what are you asking for. You want to be really clear:

1. What does the mentorship entail? (business advice & guidance? Craft advice? Shadowing?)

2. You want to set a time frame, so the mentor is clear that this isn't endless ( 3 conversations, 3 set visits, etc)

3. Explain why you've chosen him/her over all other directors. It's prestigious to be asked to be a mentor. Let the people whom you're asking know, where you are, where you want to be, and what you want to learn from them in order to reach your goals.

Preparation + Professionalism never = fool

Last tip, when seeking mentors, go after at least 5 at a time. The reasoning behind this is: if the first 4 say no, but the 5th one says YES, screw the rest! (was that harsh?) To heck with the rest! But you never would have gotten to the yes, if you started with the 1st, got a no, and got discouraged.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Monday, March 15, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 377: What's the difference between persistence and stalking?

Many people throw the word "stalking" around like it's funny. There's absolutely NOTHING funny about it. There are laws against it and it's extremely serious. If you were asking this question seriously, then you need to review the laws and seek professional help. Again, this is no joking matter to me!

If however, you meant the difference between persistence and being a pain in the ass, the answer comes down to the way you're contacting your contacts. Are you sharing new news, following up, asking a question or simply "checking in or telling them you're available?"

During conversations, are you listening or doing all of the talking? Are you coming from a place of desperation, frustration, or neediness?

As long as you are being strategic in your follow up/ relationship maintenance plan and always looking to create win/wins and ask for things your contacts can say YES to, you're most likely in good shape.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Sunday, March 14, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 376: Does it hurt my career if I don't watch TV? (I'm a camera operator)

I love that you're catching on and giving me the specifics. There are many classifications that should watch tv to know how they'd be cast in it, how they'd write for it, how they'd direct it, because while it's easy to get access to shows now, having prior knowledge does give you a leg up. But even for these classifications it's not a necessity to watch TV if it is a lifestyle choice.

As a camera operator, it's less necessary from your job perspective, because you could get called in for a dayplaying job, watch 2 episodes on Hulu and have an idea of the operating style.

So from the artists' perspective, not watching TV isn't a deal breaker. HOWEVER it's a huge rapport breaker, when you want to work in TV and the people who can hire you are passionate about TV and you tell them you don't watch it. It's like going to a couple's parenting weekend with a single parent as their moral support and telling everyone that you're not really interested in kids.

I personally love TV. I love talking about it with other people who are passionate about the shows I love, so yes, if I had the choice between bring you on my TV show or an operator who loves 30 minute single camera comedies, I'm not going to choose you. But I'm just one person.

On the one hand, you want to stay true to your values, and if you see TV as a "time-suck," then you shouldn't have to force yourself to watch it. On the other hand, you're in a highly competitive industry of people who are passionate about TV, so you get an edge when you're an expert in your field, and being able to talk about shows, is important.

Of course, you don't have to go after TV. If you're passionate about film, target those jobs.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Saturday, March 13, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 375: Were you ever on Dog Whisperer with Cesar Milan?

Yes, I was. And here's why I'm answering this as a blog question. This blog entry is all about knowing your hook and it can be in your elevator pitch, your bio, your marketing materials, your social media pages... everything. You MUST know your hook AKA your place in the industry.

So here I was (5 years ago) with an English Mastiff who weighed more than me, and all of a sudden at age 7 she decides to become "leash aggressive." Which basically means that she went after other dogs, trucks, skateboards, children, and when she bit a person, I knew I needed help.

At the time, I was living with a Strength Coach who worked with athletes, and as you all know, I'm a career coach. My video hook was:

Two successful coaches who can't coach their dog.

I made a great video tying into this theme. With the hundreds of submissions the show gets, I didn't expect to hear back any time soon. I heard back the day after I sent it in (go USPS!). Why? Because I made their job easy. I gave them their hook and their story. All Caesar had to do was show up for 3 hours and reprogram OUR brains so we could manage our indoor teddy bear/outdoor monster.

It worked, and I was grateful to have 3 more wonderful years with her. Now if only my Saint Bernard could get her act together... oops that's right, it's me not her!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Friday, March 12, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 374: What's the best way to convince people to work low pay upfront & rest deferred for a 3 wk Indie Film shoot?

The best way is to create a win/win, be professional (have legal documents drawn up regarding the deferral pay), and most of all make it fun for them.

No one wants to work for free or for lower than their pay grade, but people will be willing to do it if:

1. They like and want to support the person whose project it is
2. They believe in the material
3. There is an opportunity for them (to work in a new genre, get a scene for their reel that's missing, play with new equipment they've never used before, get a celebrity on their reel, meet new people to network with, etc.)
4. They are being given the opportunity to move up in classification
5. They need to build their credits

The critical thing to remember when people are making sacrifices for your project is to treat them and feed them well!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Thursday, March 11, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 373: How do I get an agent?

The exact question read: I have been acting for about 7 years(non-professional). A couple months ago, I auditioned for an agent and did not get it. I was just wondering how to improve my skills so that next time, I will get one.

I've given advice on getting agents before, so you may want to search the archives. However, what I will tell you are there are 3 different aspects to this question:

1. Do you need to improve your audition skills (auditioning is different than acting)?
2. Do you need to improve your interview skills to make you stand out in an agent's office?
3. After 7 years of non-professional acting, is it too soon for you to be pursuing an agent?

All of these questions are what you need to consider before you meet with another agent. The first, an acting coach can help you with, the later two are what I coach on.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 372: Favors Part 2

The second part of the question was from the "opposite side of the table."

Question:
I also want to ask favors from those more successful than me. What is the most polite way to do it? Is it proper to offer some small flat fee for their time, or offer to trade something? Put a time limit on it?

First of all, if you haven't read yesterday's blog with the distinction between favors and business requests, do that first. Again, the answer to this question comes back to are you asking for a favor or is it a business request? Unless someone is a professional coach/mentor, (someone like me who gets paid to teach) you shouldn't have to pay for an advice conversation with someone who is more successful than you. If it's for a project, lots of people do freebies, but you have to create a win/win for them to do it. Why would they want to volunteer their time?

When you write "put a time limit on it," I'm not sure exactly what you mean because you weren't specific about the type of favors you wanted to ask for. When I coach people on getting mentors, I do have them put a time limit on the commitment.

Being "polite" is dependent on the recipient. Some people prefer email, others the phone, still others like to be asked in person over a meal. It depends on who your asking and what you're asking for.

Feel free to be more specific so I can directly answer your question.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 372: Favors Part 1

Question: As I become more successful, I find more people asking me for favors (I think you call it making requests). One question asked might seem small, but I recognize how much time it adds up to, with 20 people wanting things from me every day.

Answer: First my personal clarification

Requests are defined as:

1 : the act or an instance of asking for something
2 : something asked for

as opposed to:

Favors that are defined as:

1 : friendly regard shown toward another especially by a superior
2 : gracious kindness; also : an act of such kindness

When asking for a favor it implies reciprocity… not with a request.

It is understood in the business world that the reply to a request can be to AGREE, REFUSE or OFFER ANOTHER POSSIBILITY. If you can’t accept “no” as an answer, you’re making a demand NOT a request!


Therefore, you have to determine if you are truly being asked for a favor. If so, should you choose to do the favor, you tell them what they can do for you as a favor in return. Then you can determine whether it's worth it. If not say no.

If it's business, though, then it's a request and you need to set boundaries. You have to decide WIIFY (what's in it for you). 20/day does add up and takes away from the advancement of your career. While saying NO may feel uncomfortable at first, eventually it will be very empowering and and send a message to your subconscious and the people in your life, that while you're an independent contractor, that doesn't mean that you don't have work to do and that you have time to do favors for everyone.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

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Monday, March 8, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 371: How do you get to go to the Oscars if you're not nominated?

I assume you're not a star who would be a presenter either. There actually is a way to attend if you aren't invited. You can be a seat filler. Research it for next year.

For mote tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Sunday, March 7, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 370: Is it fair for me to get a dog if I'm in the entertainment industry?

You're asking a dog lover so, here's what I'm going to say:
IF you are already working regularly, traveling all over the country/world where it is really impossible to bring a dog along, then no, it is not fair to get a dog.

However, IF you're still building your career, don't put your life on hold. No one knows what the future holds. Get a dog, get two, and when the time comes for you to travel for work, they'll have their routine and you will have people to take care of them.

My dogs, Barkley and Jake agree, giving this blog post 8 paws up!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, March 6, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 369: How do I make MONEY in this industry, I'm GREAT at what I do!

I could have asked him what he does, but it doesn't matter. I imagine all of my readers as being great at what you do. You're great at what you do and you want to make money at it. This is the frustration of the dreams we have. You see, I know a lot of people who make a lot of money doing jobs they could care less about, hate in some situations. When I ask them why they don't do something else, they all say the same thing, "I don't know what I want to do."

WE on the other hand, know exactly what we want to do. Some of us since we were young children have know the dream and imagined it in all of it's glory.

How do you make money? You let go of your attachment to your dream, and respect this industry for what it is, a business. When you start strategizing and networking like the CEO of a A-lister's company, combined with the attitude of a passionate, determined artist/craftsman/technician, then you will make money. You may think you're doing this already, but in my experience,I've yet to meet a client (and I've coached over 1000) who had this formula down before they met me.

Because most people don't have this formula down, it takes time to grow your business to the point that you're making good, steady money. Therefore, having supplemental income to keep desperation from creeping in, is essential!!!!

Keep your eye on the dream and your mind on the business.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

entertainment industry coach question 368: Is it okay to talk biz at a dog park when the person is there for his dog?

It sounds to me like you recognize someone famous who goes to your dog park. I'm making that assumption because you're asking if it's okay to talk to someone about business and how would you know he's in the business unless you talked about it already. So you recognize someone. Instead of just walking up and going straight for the business talk, talk about your dogs, build a relationship. Eventually, you can bridge the gap, because obviously if you recognize him, he knows he's famous and that you know who he is (unless you're the character from Knotting Hill who didn't know who Anna was when she came to the birthday party- okay it's 1:24am and I'm babbling a little... a lot)

The bottom line is, when you bring up business, do it in a professional way where you're asking about something that will help you move forward. Just spewing out fan banter, may cause him to change the time he comes, or change dog park completely. Okay, I'm tired. You get it. If not, write me back and I'll revisit after some sleep.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, March 4, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 367: Where are some places in LA where industry people hang out?

The question continues: "I am looking for coffee houses? Bars? Restaurants? Markets? Dog Parks? Parking meters? Etc. I want to network but really don't know where to go. I have post cards that I want to place at strategic locations. Any suggestions would be great."

"Places where people hang out" is a very general question and as my readers know, I am very specific and strategic. First you have to ask yourself, "who is my target market?" Because I can tell you where actors hang out, but if you're an actor, actors don't hire you. So really your question could be, "where do casting directors, producers, directors, and executive producers hang out?" If you're another classification you'd ask the same question based on the people who hire you.

Once you know your target market, then you can research the entertainment organizations, philanthropic organizations, clubs (and I mean sport, nature, parent type clubs not Sunset strip clubs), unions, etc., where they congregate.

As far as leaving postcards around, that's like a needle in a haystack. People who are hiring have so many relationships with people who are inviting them to things. Why would they pick up a postcard of a complete stranger and say, "I think I'll take 3 hours out of my valuable time, to go see this stranger." Not to say it can't happen, but you can spend your money and time in a better way.

Again, you're better off taking those postcards to a networking event and handing them to people once you have a conversation with them and build rapport.

If you want to put a comment in the section, telling me what classification you are, I can be more specific about what organizations you should check out.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 366: How do I get a mentor if there are only a few people who do what I do...

"...and I already know as much as they do?"

This was asked on my teleclass this morning and it brings up a very universal issue. When it comes to getting mentors, while it's great to have mentors who are doing what you want to be doing already, if you are in this person's position, at the same level, they're not the type of mentor you need.

In this case you'd be seeking out business advice and guidance from either:
1. The classification of people who hire you (so unless you know everybody who hires your classification, this type is good for you)

or

2. Any parallel classification who gets hired by the same classification as you. For example: If you're an Editor, a parallel classification (ones who also get hired by producers and directors) would be a DP, Production Designer, Actor, Writer, Key Hair & Makeup, etc. Why? Because if they are successful, they can give you advice on what they do. You're all in the same boat, just different classifications.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 365:How do you do anything (business related) for 365 days straight?

WELL OF COURSE I HAD TO CHOOSE THIS ONE! Thank you everyone who contributed your questions for the 365th day of my blog! I will answer all of them that came in. You have to admit, this person was savvy. He knew I was going to choose his. Why? It's timely, it ties into the theme of today, AND he specifically put in "business related" so I couldn't remind him that he eats, drinks, and possibly showers every day. So, well played, my friend. YOU are the one-year-anniversary question.

How do you do something business related for 365 days straight? Here's how I did it and will continue to do it...

1. I made a decision to commit to the business related task
2. I built in MAJOR accountability
3. I knew people needed my help and were counting on me

Let's take each one individually so you can apply it to your career:
1. Make a decision to commit to a daily business task that you KNOW will improve your business. It can be committing to 1 business phone call or email/day, saying a daily power statement, posting on business contacts' walls on Facebook, a daily business tweet, etc.
These are easy examples. You can commit to more complex daily business tasks, like committing to 1 power hour of focused business work, posing a daily video on YouTube branding you as an expert, etc.

2. Building in accountability was KEY for me. As you may recall, there were about 3 blogs that I posted after midnight, dating the blog for the next day. I would write, "Because I haven't gone to sleep yet, this still counts for Tuesday." As a career coach, I am setting the bar. To miss a day, may have been human, but I prefer to be a superhero for my followers. My readers are important to me and I didn't want to disappoint them.

Whose opinion is important to you? Who can hold you accountable for your daily business task. Can you post a status on a social media site daily so you know people are watching and seeing how consistent, dependable, and professional you are?

3. What's bigger than you? On those nights that I was falling asleep after speaking for 11 hours straight after my Greenlight Your Career Bootcamp, a voice would pop into my head and say, "wake up, you forgot to blog!" I could have answered the voice, "it's just one day, they'll understand." But it wasn't about me and it wasn't about how understanding everyone would've been. It was about making a commitment to something bigger. Sleep could wait a few more minutes.

Who do you care about so much that letting them down is not an option? You may not know them personally. They may be the people who need the message of the work you want to produce. How can you get your work out there if you're not doing the "business work" it takes to get your work seen?

Or maybe you do know them. Maybe it's your family; parents whom you want to see you succeed, children whom you want to be a role model for, a spouse who always believed in you who you want a better life for.

How can I blog everyday for 365 days straight? How can I not? I'm committed to your success, and as long as you're out there reading, and sending me questions I will stay committed to you for as long as I'm physically able. SO KEEP THOSE QUESTIONS COMING!

It's been a pleasure to serve you this past year and I look forward to the many blogs to come...

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, March 1, 2010

entertainment industry coach question 364: For filmmakers who distribute independently and do it as a national release, how much money do they raise

...on average for distribution an marketing costs?

This is a perfect example of a question you would ask a mentor. There are people out there who specialize in distribution and people out there who specialize in marketing. There are also people out there, to whom the questioner referred to, who have done this before.

Your job is to seek out the companies that independently raised their own marketing costs and have found a significant measure of national success.

Once you have a target list of these companies, you want to either seek out mentors within the company or request an informational interview. You will get different answers from different people and then you will find your average.

You can also post your question on Twitter & Facebook to see if people will share their experiences with you.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com