BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

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Saturday, March 31, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1118: How do I take a year off and come back if I want?

I have been getting many questions like this lately. People who want to take time off for various reasons like: they need to make money other ways, they are disillusioned by their lack of success, they are no longer feeling the passion they felt when they got into the business.

I've shared leaving acting on several occasions, and like the quote in The Godfather, "they pulled me back in", but leaving the business altogether isn't a move I've made yet.

That said, I've coached people who have left for health reasons, to take care of a family member of for many of the reasons above. So I know it can be done successfully.

How do you do it? You live your life day to day. And if in living your life you decide to leave, you do so, living each day to the fullest. If your life goes in a direction that fulfills you, that is all anyone can ask for. On the other hand, if you wake up one day and want back in, you sharpen your skills, get up to speed on new technology, sign up for the trades you've stopped reading, and call all the people you've been out of touch with and say...

I'M BACK!


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Friday, March 30, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1117: How many jobs do I need b4 I start a resume?

In the case of having less than a page worth of credits, people get concerned with how it looks.

The bottom line is, when you have very few credits you must be creative in how you present them. It's too early for a "standard" industry resume if you only have 2 credits.

Also at this early stage you will be hired primarily by people with whom you have a relationship or people who are doing freebies and don't care about resumes.

Focus on people not on your resume at this point.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1116: Should I join an industry hockey team to network?

I have to admit, I'm a little perplexed by this question because it seems blatantly obvious to me, so I'm wondering what's underneath that would stop you.

If you can't play hockey and you join the team just to network I would say no. However, if you know someone on the team, go to watch and support the guys.

If you can play hockey are you asking if it's inappropriate to network? Because if you are the answer is:

Networking doesn't have to be so pre-planned and strategic. If you are on a team with a group of industry people, concentrate on forming friendships. That's networking. If you are just joining the team to get work, don't waste your time! It is transparent when someone is not interested in getting to know people for anything other than a job.

If there is something I'm not addressing, let me know.

Hat trick!!!


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1115:What kind of gift is appropriate for someone who introduced me to someone who hired me?

That’s up to you. How much money are you making on the job? What relationship do you have with the person who introduced you? Gift cards, spa certificates, something specific that the person who introduced you likes and probably wouldn’t buy for his/herself. And if you are not in a financial situation to spend money, what's something you can offer to help the person? Even just being thoughtful is appreciated. What can you do that's thoughtful?

I encourage you all to be thoughtful this week. Be consciously aware of the people around you. Help a stranger, smile at someone who looks like he's having a bad day, call someone out of the blue who would be happy to hear from you, hold a door for somebody, let someone go ahead of you in line, carry a bag for someone. What else can you do?

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1114: Do you recommend sending postcards as thank you notes?

Since I know an actress asked this question, first I have to clarify to the other classifications, that actors make postcards with their headshot and contact info on them. Some people have the opinion that sending your postcard as a thank you note, is another way to get your face in front of the casting director.

I have a different opinion. I believe that thank you notes should be a sincere and genuine expression of gratitude. To me, a postcard with your picture, or a thank you note with your contact information is a subtle solicitation. Therefore I suggest following these steps for thank you notes:

1. Send an actual card (something that reveals something about you or something you know they like)
2. Remind the person where you met
3. Thank them for something specific
4. Add something personal to show that you were paying attention to what they were saying
5. Sign your first and last name CLEARLY

One of the reasons why people don't know what questions to ask when they meet people is because they haven't started at the end. What do you want the outcome of your meeting to be? What if the outcome you want is to be able to write an amazing thank you note that answers 2, 3, & 4? Knowing that you need to tie in something personal will create the questions you ask. Knowing you have to thank them for something specific will cause you to listen with more intention, creating deeper rapport with the person.

For those of you (and I know you're out there) who are thinking, "But, if I don't put my contact number (or picture) how will they remember who I am and know how to contact me?"

I've received hundreds of thank you notes from people. I always remember who they are. On top of that, I'm resourceful enough to know where to look for their contact information when I want to contact them.

You can follow up with "new news" on your postcard or on your letterhead, a week later. Allow yourself the simple gesture of gratitude, with a sincere thank you note, and believe me, you'll stand out.

Monday, March 26, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1113: How do I get into doing voiceovers?

I get this question from many actors and some non-actors with great voices which is why y Greenlight Mentor Interview for April is with a very successful Entertainment Industry Professional who juggles 4 industry careers including VO. Voice over work is one of the more challenging areas of entertainment to break into. It's a tightly knit group. Many working voice over artists own their own home studio so they can audition from their home and email it to their agent or a specific advertising agency. Some even do the jobs from home.

Voice over artists have marketing materials such as a website, and a voice over CD. There are different areas of work, such as commercials, cartoons, video games, greeting cards and animated movies.

I wish someone would re-do the voice on the awful garage ticket machines. That voice gives me the creeps.

Do your research on the voice over industry. Have informational interviews with successful voice over artists and agents who represent voice over artists. Or join The Greenlight Mentor Elite Program this month to hear my special guest interview.

While many think of it as a supplemental income job to their entertainment career, you will quickly learn that it is just as much a full-time business as anything else.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1112: As a coach/industry person, what's a mistake you made that I can learn from?

I think all of our lessons are different, so I would have to know what you're doing to be able to advise you on what to continue and what's not as effective. But, you did ask me personally, so I'll tell you. Maybe it's just because I'm feeling inspired because I'm on a tropical business trip, but I'd say the biggest mistake I've made is putting TOO much emphasis on my work.

Follow up is the make or break of business relationships, so you can learn from that. I do a great job with following up with business contacts, however, when it comes to following up with personal relationships or taking the time out to vacation and see friends, I haven't done a good job at all.

The good news is, now that I see what I'm missing, I can change it. I've always taken relaxing spa-type vacations as opposed to coming back East to see my friends. I think we can mix the two. Once a year, plan a 4-day spa vacation (I can probably stay longer but they all have kids) so we can all see each other.

There is something SO special about being with old friends; reminiscing and sharing how everyone's lives have grown, the good the challenges... it's invaluable.

That's a mistake I made, and I plan to change it. You can learn from this, or you can apply it to your business by evaluating how you follow up with work friends/collegues.

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1111: Is it better to pursue multiple areas of entertainment or focus on just one?

That really depends on you, your talent, and your ability to manage your time. There are plenty of slashers ( / / / ) out there. People run into trouble when they become Jack of all trades, master of none. But look at how many talented people out there act, direct, write, produce, shoot, etc.

If they can do it, maybe you can too. Only you can tell if you are mastering the arts or spreading yourself too thin.

Friday, March 23, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1110: What's the best way to find out about jobs without an agent?

Here's what most people do: They look through the trades or online and "cold" submit. The problem with that is, the people who get the cold submissions are being bombarded, because if you found it, so did many others.

You've heard me say it over and over!!!! Contacts CONTACTSCONTACTS!!! You are going to get jobs through the people you know. An agent isn't the answer to getting you work. They get +10% because YOU are 100% responsible for your career. Research what jobs are out there and then do your 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon to figure out who you know who knows somone who is connected to that production.

Network, research, preparation, follow through, professionalism. All ways to get work without an agent.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visithttp://www.TheGreenlightCoach.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1109: I submitted for a show, when I show up for the audition should I bring my material with me?

The young lady who asked this had sent in a picture & video for a show and wanted to know if on the call back she needed to bring these materials with her.

My advice is, it's better to be overprepared. Bring the picture and video with you. If they ask for it, you will show that you are prepared and professional. If they don't ask for it, then they don't need it.

You will feel more confident going in for an interview or an audition when you are as prepared as possible.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.thegreenlightcoach.com

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1108:do you suggest living in one state and flying to LA to work?

I don't make any suggestions when it comes to people's personal lives. If you can easily make that commute (get to work on time, get flights when needed, not have flight delay problems) and have enough contacts that you get called to work in LA when you live somewhere else, then it's a decision for you to make.

There are union rules about living in one place and working in another, so be sure to research those. You also have to consider the types of projects you'll be working on; how long will they keep you away from home and where will you stay, how often might you have to commute, etc.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1107: What should someone who is 12 and wants to be an actress do?

Well, if you don't live in Los Angeles (which I can tell she does not), use your "kid power." What's kid power? Most people LOVE to help a kid with drive. Make a list of actresses, actors, directors, and producers that you would like to one day work with. For example: Steven Spielberg often talks about how he was directing movies in his back yard as a kid. Find people like him and reach out to people in a letter. Tell them how old you are and what you're doing now to pursue your dream. Tell them where you live and ask them for advice on what more you can be doing right now. If you plan to go to college, ask them for advice on which colleges to consider and what you can be doing now for extra curricular activities to help you get in. Explain that you don't plan to pursue acting as a job until you're finished with your education, but in the mean time would like to build relationships with mentors so when you do move to NY or LA, you'll be ready and educated on the business side of the industry.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Monday, March 19, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1106: What is the most important concept(s) you wished you could get across to your clients from the beginning?

The actual question read in it's entirety:

"As a coach, you must come across similar questions, situations, and attitudes. What is the most important concept(s) you wished you could get across to your clients from the beginning that would help them mostly."
    GRRRRREAT question! Considering 9.8 out of 10 clients of mine who have been in the industry 10+ years say, "I wish I had you when I first started out," I would say the most important concepts are:
    1. DON'T TRY TO DO IT ALONE!

    2. If you have little or no business, sales, & marketing training, investing in it is equally if not more important than spending money on getting better at your craft. Because you can be the most talented and skilled person, but without an exceptional understanding of the business, you're just one in a million.

    3. Belief in yourself/confidence is essential to your success.

    4. Recognize that the top 10% who make it, are doing more than you know, therefore, you must learn what they know if you want to make it.

    5. Every job has it's pros and cons. Focusing on the things you can't control and complaining to people who can't do anything to help you change your situation will hurt you. Therefore, find ways to maintain financial, emotional, and creative stability.

    6. Be very aware of the 5 people closest to you; their level of success, how much money they make, and their attitude.

    That covers the big ones for now. I could probably go on for hours. Maybe I'll do a part two.

    For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

    To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

    Sunday, March 18, 2012

    getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1105:How can you get yourself known on the web, without seeming annoying or cheesy?

    Sometimes the way you phrase your questions, cracks me up! Let me address the later part of that question since it's what's helping me fill my laugh quota for today...

    If you are not annoying or cheesy, you will not be perceived that way. I'm going to go out on a limb, and guess that you're neither of those. Because if you were, you wouldn't recognize the annoyances and cheesiness of others, and therefore, you wouldn't recognize the need to NOT be like them. So, go easy on yourself, and don't do anything that you find annoying or cheesy.

    Ways to get yourself noticed on the web that are professional, effective and a smart way to market:

    1. Create a website that honestly represents what you do professionally, makes it easy for people to find the information on you that they want, and showcases your best attributes.
    *NOTE: if you are not website building savvy, and will spend a lot of time learning as you build, I suggest what my mentor Loral Langemeier says, "Strengthen your strengths, pay for your weaknesses." It's better to spend money on a professional web designer, so you can spend YOUR time generating money with your professional strengths. I recommend Kathy Hoffman athttp://www.hoffmansites.com. Tell her you're my client. She's very reasonable and very reliable.

    2. Get on Social Networking Sites like: Facebook, Twitter, Linked in, YouTube. Make informative or inquisitive posts on people's walls.

    For example: a camera operator needed an AC. He posted his request on my wall and on my Greenlight Coach wall, and found his AC through my friends network. (hint, hint, if you're reading this you should be friend requesting me on FB, joining my fan page, LinkingIn with me, and following me on Twitter.

    3. Write an informative blog or create a podcast.

    4. Post videos of yourself (demonstrating /teaching/ working) on YouTube. No dancing to a montage of music from the 80's... that's cheesy (the only exception is: if you're a professional dancer).

    5. Post informative comments AND success stories on other people's blogs, like this one! Or www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com. This gets you recognized as an expert in your field, in a community of like-minded people.

    If you have more detailed questions about any of the above, post it on my comments section and I'll answer it as a separate question.


    Saturday, March 17, 2012

    getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1104: How do I capitalize on a current project when I'm off to work on another?

    Promote on social media sites. Either make time (5-20 minutes a day) for promotion or if you're concerned about internet access, presschedule promotion on a site like Hootsuite. You can also ask your friends to promote your project on their social media sites and blogs which brings me to...

    HAVE YOUR FANS PROMOTE FOR YOU.
    If you're a camera operator who wants work, but the DP who hires you isn't working, start a marketing campaign for the DP. If you want to stay on peoples' radar when you're off working, have other people promoting you.

    And finally, the best time to call people is when you're working because you are not calling to ask for work. So again, make the time to call 1-5 people a day and let them know about the current project.

    For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

    To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

    Friday, March 16, 2012

    Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1103: How do I avoid being a networking fool?

    Well he didn't exactly say that. He was far more eloquent: When I am at a party or industry event, and I want to say hi to / network with someone important, I don't know when to cut in / interrupt. I stand there and wait, not wanting to be rude, but then I feel like I am hovering. As soon as I get ten seconds with the person, someone interrupts us ("What's up, dude!"), and I am left feeling unimportant and foolish.

    What I told him, in a personal email is that he really needs to take my 5 Keys to Your Success at a Networking Event Seminar. The reason being is because, I can tell you what to do, but until you are practicing the exercises (and in my seminars it's a safe environment) and really get the timing and your wording right, it's still going to be intimidating.

    Therefore I invite all of you to sign up for my FREE newsletter (see link below) because I tell you my schedule and when and where I will be giving that particular seminar for free.

    But to give you a little written help, it's all about confidence and realizing that the difference between you and the "important person" are the opportunities that he/she had. As soon as you take people off the pedestal and recognize that you have something important to say that will enrich their lives to know, conversations will happen naturally.

    In my Triple Your Contacts Doing What You Love product (also available on my site, lots of promotion in this blog because this is a big issue for masses of people and I want you to know I have solutions for you) I cover a lot of what goes on in my seminar, while tying it to the things you love to do. In addition, I give you a list of icebreakers to help get into the conversation... none of which include "what's your sign?"

    For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

    To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

    Thursday, March 15, 2012

    Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1102:What's the difference between persistence and stalking?

    Many people throw the word "stalking" around like it's funny. There's absolutely NOTHING funny about it. There are laws against it and it's extremely serious. If you were asking this question seriously, then you need to review the laws and seek professional help. Again, this is no joking matter to me!

    If however, you meant the difference between persistence and being a pain in the ass, the answer comes down to the way you're contacting your contacts. Are you sharing new news, following up, asking a question or simply "checking in or telling them you're available?"

    During conversations, are you listening or doing all of the talking? Are you coming from a place of desperation, frustration, or neediness?

    As long as you are being strategic in your follow up/ relationship maintenance plan and always looking to create win/wins and ask for things your contacts can say YES to, you're most likely in good shape.

    For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

    To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

    Wednesday, March 14, 2012

    Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1101:Does it hurt my career if I don't watch TV? (I'm a camera operator)

    I love that you're catching on and giving me the specifics. There are many classifications that should watch tv to know how they'd be cast in it, how they'd write for it, how they'd direct it, because while it's easy to get access to shows now, having prior knowledge does give you a leg up. But even for these classifications it's not a necessity to watch TV if it is a lifestyle choice.

    As a camera operator, it's less necessary from your job perspective, because you could get called in for a dayplaying job, watch 2 episodes on Hulu and have an idea of the operating style.

    So from the artists' perspective, not watching TV isn't a deal breaker. HOWEVER it's a huge rapport breaker, when you want to work in TV and the people who can hire you are passionate about TV and you tell them you don't watch it. It's like going to a couple's parenting weekend with a single parent as their moral support and telling everyone that you're not really interested in kids.

    I personally love TV. I love talking about it with other people who are passionate about the shows I love, so yes, if I had the choice between hiring you on my TV show or an operator who loves 30 minute single camera comedies, I'm not going to choose you. But I'm just one person.

    On the one hand, you want to stay true to your values, and if you see TV as a "time-suck," then you shouldn't have to force yourself to watch it. On the other hand, you're in a highly competitive industry of people who are passionate about TV, so you get an edge when you're an expert in your field, and being able to talk about shows, is important.

    Of course, you don't have to go after TV. If you're passionate about film, target those jobs.

    For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

    To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at www.TheGreenlightCoach.com and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!