BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon SUBSCRIBE to the GREENLIGHT Newsletter and get a FREE MP3 "Creating Powerful Business Partnerships"
For Email Newsletters you can trust

Monday, November 30, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 273:Do you have any good news for us in this bad economy?

Yes, the good news is that you're sticking with your entertainment industry career (otherwise you wouldn't be writing to me) and that means that you know what you are truly passionate about. This IS good news. I've met many people over the course of my life who feel they have no idea what they are "meant to be doing." I always wondered "is it better to have no clue what to do with your life or to have a dream that may never come true?"

The answer to that is for you to decide. I will tell you, I've answered it for myself. It's my dreams, the big picture that keep me inspired and motivated everyday. It's what keeps me in class even though I have my own business. It's what always pulls me out of a funk, no matter how long I'm in it (and the funks do get shorter and shorter as you develop the skills to stay focused on the possibility of your dreams).

People who don't have that dream spend years, sometimes a lifetime, in frustration. Not knowing your purpose can be truly traumatic. So to answer your question again, the good news is you will always have your dreams to return to, no matter the state of the industry or the economy. Passion is not to be underestimated!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Sunday, November 29, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 272: What kind of wardrobe do I need to be an extra?

The first thing to determine is your type and what kind of scenes you'd be brought in for. Unless money is not an issue, start with 5 wardrobe choices that you are most likely to be brought in for. Examples are: business attire, upscale party attire, hip student attire, average Joe (or Jane) attire, and mom or dad (decide your money bracket).

Some background artists, after many years in the industry and knowing their type, make specific wardrobe purchases, like: nurse, cop, or security guard uniforms. Just know, that in many of these castings, they will have that specific wardrobe for you.

Your best bet is to sign with an established extras casting company and ask for feedback from them. You may also want to ask advice from the established background artists you meet on your first few jobs.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, November 28, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 271: I just got an offer for a job the same week I planned my Christmas vacation. WHY DOES THIS ALWAYS HAPPEN?

I feel your frustration, I've been there. Because I can't answer the question "why does this always happen?" I will answer the secondary question buried within this question: how do you choose between a job and a vacation?

You have to weigh the pros and cons of both. Here are some questions. Answer them for yourself and them based on what you value the most, make your decision:

1. Are you planning on going on vacation alone or with significant others who are looking forward to time with you?

2. Can the vacation be rescheduled?

3. Has it been a long time since you worked or do you work regularly and fear saying no?

4. If you were to choose the vacation, do you have a trusted colleague you could recommend in your absence?

5. If you could cut to: your life 10 years from now, which decision do you imagine would have the greater positive impact on your life?

Decisions like this are not easy. There's a running joke in the biz that if you want to book work, book a vacation. But when you're the butt of the joke, it's not funny. Let me know what you decide and how it works out for you.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com


Friday, November 27, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 270: I drank too much and made an ass of myself in front of important people. Now what?

Well, the entertainment industry can be very forgiving... but sometimes it takes time for someone else to make an ass of themselves for "your incident" to become a thing of the past. The good news is, at Hollywood parties, that shouldn't take long.

Seriously, is there anyone that you feel it would be appropriate to apologize to? If so, do it. Be humble about it. If they are people you didn't know well, perhaps just let time heal the wound. As someone who is always the designated driver, and therefore sees a lot of people making your mistake, I can say, my personal level of forgiveness stems from the level of "ass." If someone is nasty to me, I don't forget it too soon. I don't really care or take it personally if he/she is drunk, however, I wouldn't hire them. I'm not saying this to freak you out, I'm saying it as a lesson to those who are reading this. Be aware of your actions when you're out in public around industry professions. Your actions may have consequences.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, November 26, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 269: I have multiple interests, but when looking for a job, I'm being forced in one direction. Advice?

If you have multiple interests, there are quite a few things to weigh out:

1. What is your fastest path to making a name and an income for yourself?
This is to be considered if (a) money is an issue and you need to support yourself and if (b) you have the networking skills (or are willing to develop them) to make a name for yourself in one area, and then make a transition to another. For example: television DPs who build relationships on their show and then ask for the opportunity to direct.

2. Can any of your interests be done simultaneously without causing conflict?
Consider this, if one of the interests is an "office job" while other interests can be pursued after work and on weekends and no one is the wiser. For example: A studio publicist with an interest in producing can produce short films on weekends, as well as read scripts before going to bed.

3. Can your interests be prioritized so you can create a long term plan?
When you think about where you want to be in 20 years, can you work backwards and see how the different interests flow into each other? For example: (Years 1-3): an actress who starts out doing indie films, (years 3-5) makes a name for herself, (years 5-10) creates a production company producing as well as acting, (years 10-12) adds directing to her resume, (years 12 and on) has a productive career wearing all the different hats she desires.

4. Do the skill sets compliment each other or are they on completely different paths?
Some jobs in the entertainment industry compliment each other. For example: an editor who tells the story by putting the pieces together (literally) could take those skills and transition to directing. He may even save time in post because he's editing in his head as he creates his shot list.
Or are they completely different paths, like a camera operator who wants to produce. While it's absolutely possible, the skill sets are different. The learning curve it takes to perfect your skills as a camera operator (as well as staying up to speed on the latest equipment) can take just as long as learning how to produce a movie (factoring in development, scheduling, budgeting, and having a knowledge of the different departments). With producing, sometimes, the smaller the budget, the more you need to know. That's because on a studio film there are different people for the many different components to producing a film. With a low budget indie, you could be doing everything from raising the money, to filing in for a boom operator who doesn't show up.
5. Is one of your interests the "big dream"?
If so, consider the skill or craft that needs to be developed. Is that something you can do with a full or part time job? If yes, work on your craft and build relationships while maintaining financial stability. If no, are there opportunities to work your way up the ladder (in a studio system or a crafts department like in camera and production design) to make money and learn from mentors?

The good news is, today's version of the industry allows people to wear different hats and move up in departments. The "less-good" news is that it doesn't make your choices any easier.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 268: How do I get more work, better work, or different work?

This was a question asked on my Facebook wall, because as a career coach, that's what I do, and it says just that in my profile. I help people get more work, better work, or different work. Now the question itself is too general to answer in one blog, which is why I'm on day number 268.

My advice to this person is:
1. Read my blog, subscribe to my newsletter and watch my videos. They're all free and will give you ideas.
2. Do an evaluation of where you are right now. Getting work is in direct correlation to the number of people you know who can hire you and how well you know them. So how many people do you know who can hire you and how well do you know them?
3. Once you've done numbers 1 & 2, design specific questions that pertain to where you are in your career and ask them.

People in the entertainment industry work with a career coach because they've spent years working on their craft, yet, have neglected learning the business tools necessary for success as a freelancer. If you're frustrated because you've been doing the same things over and over to get work, and not getting the results you want, it's important to recognize that having business skills is just as important as having the skills of your craft.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 267: Should I call contacts on Thanksgiving to wish them a happy holiday?

This is one of those times when I make an exception to my rule (the rule being call people when you think you'll get them in). There's still time BEFORE the holiday to call and wish contacts a happy Thanksgiving. I wouldn't encourage you to call them on the day. Thanksgiving is a holiday to be with family and friends, so to call on the day, could be viewed as obtrusive.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, November 23, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 266: Are things picking up in the industry? I heard pilot season is getting back to normal.

"Are things picking up in the industry?" is one of those questions, that is relevant to you specifically. If things are in fact picking up according to what's in production, it's irrelevant if you don't know anyone who can hire you. On the flip side, if things are so slow that there are only 3 productions in town, yet you're working on one, it doesn't really matter if things pick up.

More importantly:
1. How are you educating yourself to find out what's in production in your area?
2. How actively are you pursuing the people who are working on those productions?
3. How often do you let "the state of the industry" be an excuse or something to blame, for you not giving 100% to taking action?

This has always been an unstable industry, so while I won't assume it always will be, I will prepare for (and suggest that you do, too) the ups and the downs that come with the life of a freelancer.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoach.com

Sunday, November 22, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 265: Should I be building my reel in film school or taking business classes?

It depends on the business classes your film school offers. You should absolutely be focused on the business side of the industry while in film school, however if the marketing, sales, and business classes are not directly related to the entertainment industry, you will have to get really clear on how what they're teaching, applies to you.

Film school IS for building your reel, perfecting your craft, building relationships, obtaining mentors, and preparing for entering the industry armed with an understanding of the business.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, the Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, November 21, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 264: Can you always move up within your department?

If you're asking me if it's possible to move up in classification (camera assistant to camera operator, assistant editor to editor, AD to director, background performer to co-star, writers assistant to staff writer), the answer is YES, it is possible.

That said, you must be strategic about making the move. People who stop their "bread and butter" income classification cold turkey, when they don't have enough contacts to hire them as the next classification, spend anywhere from 2-5 years minimum trying to build the trust with people who can hire them.

Have a plan for making the move up, and if you need help, that's what I'm here for.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Friday, November 20, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 263: What would be the best way to showcase my film with top studio executives?

The best way to showcase your film with top studio executives is to have a relationships with top studio execs. If you don't, understand that they don't have time to respond to all the people who wants to showcase their film. That's why they have development departments. The typical way, is to have an agent who represents the film submit it. Usually an associate will look at it first and then it will move up the ladder. If you have a great agent who has a great relationship with the exec, it may go to the exec directly. If you don't have an agent, perhaps an entertainment attorney. The bottom line is, there's a system of "not accepting unsolicited scripts/films" in place to protect you and the studio execs.

If you don't have a relationship with a studio exec, or an agent/attorney, another way is to get it into a highly accredited film festival, one where studio execs would attend, or at least have a representative from their office attending.

If it's not getting accepted into film festivals, get some feedback from qualified mentors. Once you get enough positive feedback, create a buzz campaign around it and then host your own screening.

These are just a few of the ways. Good luck!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, November 19, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 262: How do you live off of freelance?

You recognize that being a freelancer is the equivalent of being an entrepreneur. You treat your business the same way any CEO of a company would treat his/her company. In addition, you recognize the nature of being a freelancer. That means that because work could potentially be feast or famine, you save for "rainy days."

What I personally encourage my clients to do, is:
CREATE MULTIPLE STREAMS OF INCOME!

I once believed that if I spent even a week taking a vacation, that it would cost my entertainment career. It didn't. Nor did having a supplemental, full-time, income job for 11 years. People in our industry are so afraid to take the time to build an additional income stream. You can choose fear, or you can take a risk. With fear, you know you'll never get any supplemental or passive income streams going. With risk... you never know.

For more tips and articles by the top entertainment industry coach, the Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 261: Are there scams I should be watching out for?

In an industry filled with people who desperately want to work, there is a higher risk of running into scam artists. Perhaps the community can chime in with some of their experiences. Personally, I have not experienced a scam, though I can certainly give you some things to look out for:

1. An agent or manager who tells you that you have to pay to be a client.

2. When someone insists that before they hire you, you must pay to have pictures or reels redone by the person they recommend.

3. Someone who guarantees they will get you work once you pay them.

Are you seeing a theme here? I know there have been some scams on Craig's list that escape me right now. When in doubt, check it out. Trust your instincts, be smart (don't put yourself in a dangerous situation), and decide how much you're willing to risk.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, the Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 260: Who do I talk to about all of the changing camera technology?

I was just a moderator on a panel where this was the topic of discussion. You can reach out to:

  1. people in the camera department
  2. people at organizations such as the SOC.org (the panelists were all in the SOC)
  3. people at the rental houses

The overall message from the panel I moderated, was: technology is changing constantly. It’s important to stay current on the changes. Mentors are willing to talk to you, rental house employees want to help you and educate you, and resources are available for you to stay current no matter how busy you are.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, November 16, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 259: How many years do you have to be in the industry to be considered “experienced”?

I’m not sure why you’re asking me this question. I need more context. But for now, I’ll say, “Confidence can be more powerful than experience.” In other words, if you have enough experience to know how to do your skill or craft, confidence will get you a job over someone who’s been in the industry for 20 years and still doesn’t consider him/herself experienced “enough”.

Don’t get caught up in number of years. Our industry doesn’t have a rule book. Work on your skill/craft/art, educate yourself on the nature of our industry and the business side of the business, and finally, build your confidence.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Sunday, November 15, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 258: I want to be a set massage therapist. How do I do that?

You must give ME 100 massages.

Okay, that’s not the real answer, but I sure wouldn’t mind it. I don’t think there’s a union for set massage therapists, but I’d check with IATSE, just to be sure.

All of the tools I share with other classifications who want to work on sets apply to you, too:

  1. It’s who you know, so build relationships with people who work on sets and can get you on.
  2. Market yourself, and create a “buzzy” hook, so you’ll be memorable.
  3. Brush up on your interviewing skills.
  4. Find other successes set masseuses and model them.
  5. Network, network, network!
For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, November 14, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 257: Is it better to be with a small agent in a big agency or an aggressive agent in a smaller agency?

Every situation is different. I would start by asking your current contacts who know you, your body of work, and your networking skills, for their opinions.

Remember, you are a product that an agent is selling, but they get +10% for a reason. That reason is because you are still 100% responsible for your success. An agent is a part of YOUR team. When choosing between agents, who feels like the best fit for your team? What do you value in an agent relationship? Who do the agents you’re meeting with have relationships with? What are your expectations of what an agent should be doing for you.

Once you’ve answered the above questions for yourself, you’ll have a clear idea of the conversations you will have with the agents you meet. Then it will be more about the agent/client relationship and less about the agency.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Friday, November 13, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 256: What is this FB group that everyone is joining about bringing work back to California?

The question continued: I live in San Francisco, does this still affect me?

ITS TIME TO SHOOT MOVIES AND TV IN CALIFORNIA AGAIN 2 !!!

Ed Gutentag started it, and yes, it affects you. Join the group and ask questions. This is working towards change at the grassroots level to bring film production back to California. They’ve already spoken to many California politicians and reporters. Get involved. It takes people to create change.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, November 12, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 255: What do I do if I accepted a freebie and then just got a call for a paying gig that conflicts?

This is one of those decisions that is an A-list problem to have, yet a problem none-the-less. It is important to trust your gut/instincts on this. What do you think/feel is the right choice. Can you replace yourself on the freebie, giving a colleague an opportunity and helping the producers who brought you on?

Obviously, you’d like to take the paying gig, which is why you’re asking the question (or you would have simply turned it down). Weigh out the pros and cons of taking the paying gig and abandoning the freebie. Think short term AND long term.

If you do choose to pass on the freebie, do it professionally and use everything in your power to help them replace you.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com


Wednesday, November 11, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 254: How do I find someone to write a short film for me?

There are many different ways to find a writer. Here are a few suggestions:

  1. If you know people who know writers, ask for a referral.
  2. You can post an ad on Craig’s List, something along the lines of: looking for a writer for a short film in the _____ genre. [no pay or some pay]. Please send writing sample for this genre ONLY to: (your email address)
  3. Research writer’s groups, websites, and associations and post the ad above
  4. Post ad on twitter and Facebook
  5. If you already know of a writer who wrote a short that you enjoyed, reach out to him/her
For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 253: How do I decide between film schools?

Deciding on a film school is such a personal issue. Things like cost, location, and size preference may factor in. From the business perspective, consider things like:

1. Location distance from a production city

2. Name recognition

3. A strong alumni community

4. The teachers (are they currently in the business, ever worked in the business, etc.)

5. Industry internships

If you have specific questions, email me directly.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, November 9, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 252: Is it appropriate for a background performer to eat food at the craft services table?

Absolutely! The reason there is a craft services table is to eat and drink so you can maintain your energy and stay healthy on the shoot. Be professional. Don't hog it all! And DON'T stuff your pockets for later!

Sunday, November 8, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 251: Do I look desperate if I try to speak to a celebrity after a Q & A?

It depends on how you present yourself. First of all, what is your purpose for speaking to the celebrity? If it's just to say, "I love your work," that's fine, not desperate, and NOT strategic. Celebrities hear that all the time, and while I'm sure they appreciate it, it's not unique.

A strategy is, to be unique by asking a specific question, and have a plan for following up. Your objective should be to build an advice and guidance relationship with the celebrity because he/she can give you tips on how to get where you want to go faster.

Another tip, is to watch what others do. When the celebrity steps off the stage to greet attendees, watch what people do wrong (infringe on personal space, not taking NO for an answer, gushing like a fan, etc.). When you see what doesn't work, you'll feel more confident about your professional approach.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, November 7, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 250: Is it bad when people tag me in pictures on Facebook that aren't professional?

It certainly can be. Remember, EVERYTHING on the world wide web is there "somewhere" forever. There have already been examples of actors who posted "revealing" blogs when they were unknown, and as soon as they hit stardom, some reporter dug up the blog and to my entertainment, it made The Soup.

What if five years from now you are interviewing for a job (in June) and someone googles you only to find an old Halloween picture with no knowledge that it was a holiday picture. All they see is a tasteless costume or an x-rated French Maid.

I'm not saying you shouldn't share your pictures, I certainly do. Just keep in mind that if you are partying or doing something that could end up on a google search some day, it could potentially come back to haunt you professionally. This goes for the written word as well.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Friday, November 6, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 249: Why do so many people seem to be working and I'm not hearing about anything?

Stop comparing yourself to other people. If you really want to know why they're working and you're not, ask them what they're doing to generate work.

The bottom line, there's always work out there and there will always be people to work those jobs. If you're not getting the jobs, you have to focus on the business tools and strategies for building and strengthening your relationships.

Also, know that whatever questions you ask, your brain will come up with answers. I imagine your mind has been not been kind with it's answer to this one. Therefore, ask more empowering questions like: How can I generate work for myself, who do I have to know to get work, what more can I be doing to advance my career?

Let your brain ponder those, because it will come up with better answers.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, November 5, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 248:I'd like more advice on how to be my husband's manager.

This is in response to a previous post. Okay, basically, you want to create a strategy plan together for targeting people and companies. You can help by:

1. Making calls and follow up calls on his behalf
2. Being his "ice breaker" at networking events
3. Doing the research that he doesn't have time to do
4. Creating your own letter head/logo to send out letters and emails on his behalf
5. Create/deepen your relationships with the people who hire him
6. Take meetings with him (other than interviews)
7. Doing the tasks that need to be done, but make his stomach queasy

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 247: How do I learn what industry lingo means? Yesterday, I was an extra and was told to stand on an apple box.

This made me chuckle. It reminded me of my first shoot when I heard the DP yell, "Kill the baby." There may be a book on industry lingo, you should research that. I've also discovered that different crews/departments have their own "private lingo."

The important thing is that when you don't know, you ask. You may have to evaluate who the best person to ask is, but ask. If you spend 20 minutes looking around for an actual apple box, you'll look greener than if you actually ask someone.

As you acquire mentors, ask them what lingo they use.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 246: I like in Boca Raton, FL. How do I meet people from here?

Depending on your classification, you can start closer to home. For example, if you're in the camera department, there is a Local 600 office in Orlando. You can call their office and begin there. If you're not in camera, research local unions in your classification in Florida. Because Florida does have more production than most states, you can begin reaching out to the entertainment community in Miami and Orlando.

In addition, you can reach out to people in Los Angeles and New York (larger production cities) through Facebook, unions, production companies, etc. I'd have to know what classification you're in to give you the specifics, but I can tell you that most unions have a directory either on line or in hard copy.

1. Research the people you want to contact to build a relationship with and be sure you have contact information before doing thorough research.

2. Reach out to the people you want to create a relationship with on Facebook. Be sure to send a personal note about who you are and that you'd like to ask for some advice.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, November 2, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 245: How do you get the "big break"?

This was asked today on the podcast I was interviewed on. The "big break" is somewhat undefinable, illusive like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster. The "big break" can be when you got your first agent, who sent you out on the first audition, that led to 2 years later the casting director bringing you in for an under five, that led to more roles, that led to your series regular role, that led to you getting a movie on hiatus, that led to more movies, that led to your "breakout film," that led to your Oscar role.

The point I'm trying to make is, don't look for the "big break." Don't anticipate if this is the "breakout film." Do your work and celebrate the successes along the way. Acknowledge the people who help you as you build the stepping stones of your career.

Terms like "Overnight Success," "Breakout Film," and "Big Break" are created for marketing purposes. How many times have you heard someone say that it took them 15 years to become an overnight success?

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Sunday, November 1, 2009

entertainment industry coach question 244: I met someone at a Halloween party and didn't tell him I was in the industry. How do I follow up now?

The same way you would follow up with him if you didn't know he was in the industry, and you just hit it off so it made sense to keep in touch.

This is when "a client" will typically say, "Well if I didn't know he was in the industry, I probably wouldn't follow up." Okay, I respect your honesty. Most of us have plenty of friends already. However, I appreciate your ability to spot an opportunity.

In the future, if you know the person is in the industry and you don't want to share that you are as well, then treat the conversation "as if" you wanted to continue a friendship with him/her. Then you will know why you're following up, because you'll have discussed the things you have in common, possible plans for a future get together, or a specific plan. I don't mean be phony, I mean, really look for the commonalities.

In this case, because you didn't reveal that you're in the industry you can either:
1. Reflect on your conversation and see if there is a commonality you can build a follow up conversation on.
2. Call specifically to tell him: you're in the industry, what you do, and have a business advice question for him (for which his answer will require you to take action, so you can follow up with him on your results).

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com