BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

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Thursday, May 16, 2013

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1280: I grew up in India and as a result English is my second language (cont'd)


"I grew up in India and as a result English is my second language. I am looking to improve my comprehension when I read my text books or watch movies, I feel I can understand parts of everything but am left to connect the dots myself - which obviously makes it difficult to have a long conversation. And a lot of times I see my self uselessly nodding even when I am not able to grasp everything that is being said. If you have any pointers that can help me I would really appreciate it."
Here is my answer:

If it makes you feel any better, I've been in many conversations where people are just nodded their head not grasping everything, and English is their first language :-)

That said, improving your comprehension as you're doing is a great start. In addition, you can do a few things. 

1. Write down the topic of discussion or a specific word to research later. I do this when I'm talking with people in other industries who bring me in to speak and I have no idea what they are talking about in regards to specifics in their industry. I do nod my head like you, but I do it to create rapport, knowing later I will look up the subjects they were discussing. 

2. You can ask a question for clarification. Be loud and proud of where you come from and say, "I'm from India, so English is my second language. I'm fascinated by what you're talking about, so can you clarify what you mean by _____ because it's not translating for me." 

3. Listen carefully. I'm sure you think you're already doing that, yet sometimes, when you "notice" that you're not comprehending, you start to have thoughts "narrating" what you're experiencing" so you don't hear everything that is being said. For example a narration might be... "What did he just say? I don't understand that. This is so frustrating. I wish I understood English better" and the thoughts keep coming and all of a sudden you've missed 30 seconds of what was said making it even more confusing. 

Hope these tips help. And know that it will continue to get easier. 



For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do! 

Friday, January 11, 2013

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1279: do you think having a weird hair color is hurtful and limiting or is beneficial and makes you stand out as an actor?

It is both. Having a weird hair color makes you a character. If a Casting Director is looking for a young mom for a Tide commercial, he won't be calling in a young mom with purple hair. However, having a weird hair color makes you stand our for parts that call for the type of person that has weird hair color. So if the next day that same Casting Director gets a a Coke commercial that calls for hipsters, he will call in people with weird hair, tattoos, and piercings.

You can look at it as everyone is "limited" to their type. The questions you want to research are:
1. How many people am I competing against with weird colored hair?
2. How many casting calls am I seeing for people with weird colored hair?
3. How many roles do I see on TV or in films with people my age/gender with weird colored hair?

Then you can decide if you want to go with the permanent color, or the trendy wash outs.

Bottom line is, you want to feel true to yourself and confident when you are auditioning. If your headshots are captivating, you could get called in for a role that didn't call for weird colored hair, just because the Casting Director wants to see your take on the character.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com
To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1278: How do you deal with a boss you can't stand?

Unfortunately, I've had this question before. Here are some questions to consider:

1. Do you need the job for: the income, the prestige, the education, the connections, etc?
2. What are the underlying feelings for your boss: unhealthy stress, anger, jealousy, resentment, fear, insecurity, etc?
3. Have you pursued other opportunities?

Let's say you work in a "department" where your boss (the head of the department) is a screamer. AND, your boss is hugely "in demand," so you fear leaving because the perks of working in this department are: lots of money, good contacts for the future when you move moves up in classification, steady work, and the rest of the crew are like family.

Here are some tips for tolerating your boss:

1. Immediately start building relationships outside of your "crew family" so that you may find yourself in an equally prestigious work opportunity with a better boss. Part of this is to be meeting people that make you happy and inspire you.

2. Start planning for your future by building a reel. This will make your current job feel like a day-job while you pursue something you're more passionate about. Create a 1-2 year plan to be out of there! It will give you something to live for (I'm being dramatic, but as I said yesterday, I've been there).

3. Because he is a screamer, but your job is not in jeopardy, recognize that he's just a schmuck and his screaming is due to lack of management skills and most likely a small.......... sense of self. I know, that doesn't help in the moment, HOWEVER, on top of recognizing this, I want you to create an emotional anchor* that you can fire off when he's done.

What's most important is your health! Working for someone like this can literally be hazardous to your health because of suppressed emotions and stress. So you MUST find a healthy outlet.

*an anchor is a tool to change your emotional state. For more information on how to create an anchor, contact me or order my book And...Action! at Amazon.com

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com
To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Friday, September 7, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1277: I'm a college student and I don't know what to expect if I come out to LA to be a screenwriter.

...Can you tell me?"

I'm so glad, that as a college student, you recognize that there are expectations to address. Too many people move to LA with unrealistic expectations and then give up quickly when they're not met.

My advice is to expect what you can control:

1. Expect to find a job that will give you financial stability (this may or may not be in the entertainment industry- see a previous post when I covered industry jobs for writers)

2. Expect to commit to a writing ritual- in other words how much writing do you plan to do and how often?

3. Expect to invest in your career- this may mean joining networking organizations, becoming a guild member, taking educational courses for both your craft and your business, and the material costs of having a writing business

4. Expect to update your material often, adding to your writing portfolio- this may mean new scripts or re-writes on older ones

5. Expect to be a business which, like a business in any industry, requires relationships, product, marketing, patience, perseverance, and a team (just to name a few)

Even though I answered this for a writer, this blog applies to all classifications in the entertainment industry.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com
To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Thursday, September 6, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1276: I don't understand, isn't it our job to tell people we are available?

This was a question in response to my blog post a few days ago. Yes, it is your job to let people know you are available for work. However, it's how you let them know that will determine how your relationship will evolve.

For example: If I give you advice for 2 hours and at the end you say, "Great thanks. And by the way, I'm available," it just added something unnecessary and for me, personally, annoying, because I already know a ton of people whom I coach and would hire before you. Why? Because I care about them, like them, and trust them. So by you telling me you're available, you've just turned me off a bit. When you say "think of me" it tells me that you don't have enough confidence that you made an impression that is memorable.

The people it is "your job" to tell that you are available, are the people for whom you are their first 5-10 calls when they are looking. They need to know you're available because they may assume you're already working.

Cold calling people on production lists who are working to let them know you're available is NOT strategic, time consuming, and very rarely creates results. Your time can be better spent developing relationships on a deeper level with targeted people.

When you are meeting people, there are subtle ways to let them know you're available which are not turn offs. It's all about the quality of your questions. When you are asking for advice on how to get work, they know you're available.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com
To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1275: How do I figure out if I should pursue a career in entertainment?

Research, research, research! Millions of people have dreams of making it in the entertainment industry. The majority will never do more than dream. Like in every industry, there are pros and cons to the entertainment industry.

Here are some tips:

1. Write down what you want to do in the industry AND the expectations of what you think you'll be doing in that job.

2. Write down your expectations of what it will be like to work in entertainment; the time frame until you're working steadily, the hours worked, the pay scale, and everything else you imagine a career in entertainment to be.

3. Go on entertainment industry forums and get people's feedback on your expectations.

Now, people may be brutal if your expectations are completely unreasonable, but don't be discouraged. If you truly want to pursue your dream, get lots of opinions on others' experiences working in the business. If you are still discouraged, contact me, and we can discuss your particular situation. Remember, sometimes people have their own agenda for discouraging you. I will always encourage you, I'll be realistic and honest in an encouraging way.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1274: Do you think it is wise to send a letter congratulating someone who was recently promoted?

... even if that person doesn't know who you are? In such a letter, I would confine my remarks to their good fortune and not try to pitch or ask them for anything. Or is it weird?"

I don't think it's weird at all. I think it's a great idea, BECAUSE you added two very important points:

1. Do not pitch the person
2. Do not ask for anything

This is a congratulatory note. It gets your name in front of the person. It may even cause the person to Google you to see if he/she knows you from somewhere. Either way, your name is in front of the person so that someday down the line, when your name is in front of him/her again, there will be a familiarity.

These types of notes are relationship builders. There should be NO agenda attached. You will most likely never hear back from the person, but that's not the point.

I like the way you're thinking!


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com