BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon SUBSCRIBE to the GREENLIGHT Newsletter and get a FREE MP3 "Creating Powerful Business Partnerships"
For Email Newsletters you can trust

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

question 119: Does it make me look bad if I give someone a testimonial, like I needed help?

People give me testimonials all of the time. I even have a section on my site "Spotlight" where I spotlight clients' successes.

If you're being asked for a testimonial it means that you've had success and benefited from working with the person/company. People who are reading the testimonial are impressed with your success, not judging you for needing help. They're reading the testimonial because they need help and want to know that this is a person/company that delivers.

As someone who receives testimonials all of the time, I can tell you, it's very appreciated. Instead of worrying about what others are thinking about you, focus on contributing to someone else.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, June 29, 2009

question 118: I'm not involved in my union other than paying my dues. Does this really matter?


You tell me. Unions have a lot to offer:
1. Contacts in other members
2. Free movies
3. Content on website
4. Networking/family events
5. Educational/Technical seminars and materials
6. Discount tickets for movies, family trips, rental cars, etc.
7. Credit Lines

And much more... see if your union has an orientation that addresses all of the benefits of being a union member

There are also political decisions being made on your behalf. Wouldn't you like to know and even be a part in decisions affecting your income, benefits, safety, etc?

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Sunday, June 28, 2009

Question 117: Should I be on Twitter?

Jury is still out on this one. Depends on your objective. If it's to follow me, yes, because of the value I provide in my posts. Though even I haven't figured out the value of Tweeting. I just post it there and link it to my Facebook page where I do my social networking. There are some great marketing strategies that recognizable "names" are using. You can model them.

This is one of those blogs, that if anyone has had great career success using Twitter, I would love for you to write about it in the comment section.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, June 27, 2009

question 116: How do I explain the lapse in dates on my resume?

REMOVE DATES! Most entertainment classification resumes only need the project name, who hired you directly, and the name of the production company.

Dates give people a reason to say no. Why? Because they see lapses in time or they see how old you are (because your first job was in '73 and they weren't born yet!).

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Friday, June 26, 2009

question 115: What if I don't want to go to a networking event alone but I don't know anyone to go with?

You have to know someone, even if that someone isn't in the industry. Start there, so that you can meet 10 people at the first event you attend. Share with the new people you meet that you're looking for someone to attend events with.

If you literally don't know anyone (maybe you just moved to town) you're going to have to create a strategy for overcoming your fear, just for the first event, so you can meet a few people to start your contacts.

Because it's about "who you know and who knows you" it's essential that you get yourself out there.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Question 114: Why does my 12-year-old daughter's acting classes cost so much more than my 21-year-olds?

Supply and demand. There are so many acting schools for adults that to stay competitive, the market price stays relatively low. The more reputable classes tend to be slightly pricier.

For kids, however, there aren't as many schools. Plus, because parents are paying, the schools figure parents are willing to spend a lot of money on their little darlings.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Question 113: My parents have given me a deadline to make $ or they will stop supporting me. How can I speed up the process of getting work?

Ummm... well, if you plan to make a career in entertainment, you are going to have to support yourself during the ups and downs of being a freelancer. So, my first suggestion is to focus on your entertainment career AND a secondary source of income other than your parents. Just a suggestion...

How do you speed up the process?

1. You continue to master your craft

2. Create as many relationships as humanly possible

3. Seek out A-list mentors

4. Help others

5. Feel the fear and act in spite of it!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Question 112: What schools do you recommend?

Reputable ones. The ones with great alumni and that look good on your resume. There are so many schools that can teach you what you need to learn. That said, the only ones people looking at your resume are going to care about, are the ones they recognize.

When I first moved out here, I got an agent as a mentor. She gave me a list of the top 5 acting schools in town. Through the years after following her advice, casting directors have always commented on the reputable schools where I've trained.

If you have questions about what schools are reputable for your classification, call someone who reads resumes all the time and see if he/she would be willing to speak to you about it for a few minutes.

Note: some recognizable schools are: in Los Angeles (USC, AFI, UCLA, CAL ART, GROUNDLINGS, and more) NY, (NYU, SUNY Purchase, and more) and Chicago (The Second City...I know there are more that I'm not aware of). There are many recognizable film/theater departments at colleges in various states as well. If you have a school you'd like to add, put it in my comments. Thanks!


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Monday, June 22, 2009

Question 111:How do I get on a show that I absolutely LOVE?

You target it hardcore! How?

1. Do a show breakdown (a list of every actor and crew member on the show). 

2. Send an email to everyone you know to see if anyone is connected to anyone working on the show.

3. Reach out to as many people on the show as you can- as mentors

4. Once you have a connection, get a set visit

5. Create relationships with as many people you meet as possible remembering they must know you, like you, and trust you, before you bring up wanting to work on the show

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Question 111

Sunday, June 21, 2009

Question 110: I am always amused when you say everyone needs to know directors. I'm a director. Who do I need to know to get work?

Everyone. See question June 18th. That said, you specifically need to know the people who hire you. That differs from medium and budget range.

Studio Films: By the time you're being hired for studio films, you'll already know the people you need to know.
Indie Films: Independent Producers, or anyone who will give you money to direct your own film.
Commercials: Commercial Production companies. Many big ones have in-house directors. Advertising Agency Execs.
Television: Executive Producers, Network executives, UPMs, Line Producers

And of course, get yourself some director mentors!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, June 20, 2009

question 109: I have a new baby who's taking up a lot of my time. Should I admit this to people?

The person who asked this question is a woman, however, I want to go on record as saying that a male client asked this question recently, as well.  I'll give you the same answer I gave him...

Absolutely! Do you know how relatable you will suddenly be to every person who's a parent? This is a business of relationships. People don't want to talk business 24/7. They want to share in your joys both professionally and personally. Especially if the baby is taking up a lot of your time, people with kids will completely understand. People without kids can still imagine what you're going through.  The important thing to realize is that if people know you're out of touch because of a baby, they have a lot more respect for you than the person who's out of touch because he's sitting at home waiting for the phone to ring and work to fall into his lap. 

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Question 108: How do I get an acting job on a TV show this fall?

I haven't gone to bed yet, so this still counts as Friday's blog.  Technicalities out of the way... on to the question. I like your specificity. You're focused on TV. I'm going to give you some tips. Usually, I don't say "don't" because if I tell you DON'T think about a purple elephant, what do you think about? However, when I use "don't" below, it's not an embedded command to do it, I'm saying "don't" because so many people "do" these things, that I'm using your language instead of "coaching language." If that was confusing, it's just because I'm blogging at 1 am.

Okay, here are some tips: 

1. Be union ready. Most shows are SAG or AFTRA.

2. Know your next step. If you have never worked on a tv show before, pursue co-stars/under 5 lines. If you have a long resume of co-stars, start pursuing guest stars, and so on.

3. Know your type. Don't market yourself against your type. Don't submit for roles you're not right for. Actors like to argue this point, reminding me of the exceptions. While I'm the first to agree that there are exceptions to every rule, if 200 actors submit for a part that they want to "break the type" for, it makes the Casting Director's job harder. It's the Casting Director's job to get creative with the exceptions. Concentrate on building relationships with CDs as opposed to making their job harder. 

4. Do your research. Know what shows hire your type and target them.  

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Thursday, June 18, 2009

question 107: You said "know everybody." Isn't that really general?

Ah, trying to catch me contradicting myself, are you? Well, no go. I stand by my theory and here's why...

I say everybody, because you never know who you're going to connect with, who they're connected to, and how you can help each other. 

A big mistake people make is to judge people by their appearance. This isn't junior high. A guy in a plaid shirt, with pocket protector, and glasses could very well be a Simpsons writer. The flashy guy with the designer clothes, expensive sunglasses, and fancy car, could be a wanna-be in debt.

Another reason to know everyone is because people in other classifications may know people who can hire you. Because they're not in direct competition with you, they're more likely to give you referrals and make introductions.

There are certainly strategies when you want to get specific with who your target (the people who can most directly get you where you want to be the fastest). For all other times, be open to the people you meet, searching for people with like-minded sensibilities.
 
For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Question 106: I have your book, I've read your blog, and I'm still procrastinating on getting a mentor. What's my problem?!

Right back atcha! What is your problem? You tell me. You want a mentor, you have the tools to get one and yet... So, you don't have a mentor. How is that a problem for you? The costs have to outweigh your CHOICE to procrastinate. 

Here's what mentors have to offer:

1. Real world experience, success "footprints," and practical advice.

2. Inspiration. It's SO amazing to listen to stories from people who are doing what you share a passion in.

3. A track record of what works and what doesn't work.

4. Invitations to sets, parties, and industry events.

5. Tips, tricks, and secrets about your trade.

So, why wouldn't you want to be talking to mentors? Have you heard the saying, you're as rich as the sum of the 5 people's incomes you're closest to. I believe it's the same as your level of success. If you surround yourself with people who are at the same level as you or below, you're not going to be exposed to the possibilities and the realities of the next level. 

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Question 105: How are all of these people getting themselves seen on YouTube?

I put myself on YouTube...

It's actually quite simple. You set up an account and then upload your video material. Some people put a lot into the production of web series, others just use a home recorder. A Flip camera makes it REALLY easy. You shoot, plug in to your computer, and the software is in there to upload it straight to YouTube or you can edit it first. 

Then, you want to kick in "viral marketing techniques." Look up articles on Google for more information on that. Also, use social networking sites. Post your YouTube links on your Facebook page, etc. 

If you are creating a character or a webseries, consistency is really important to prove that you're not a "one-hit-wonder" and that there is room to grow as well as building a following.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Monday, June 15, 2009

Question 104: When is the best time of year to switch agents? Part 2

Part two pre-supposes that you've read part one and determined that you do, in fact, believe switching agents is the best choice for you. Therefore, here's some information on how to go about it:

Research your market and the hiring seasons.

For example, while pilot season is not what it used to be, an actor looking for representation from January - March is not recognizing that agents are working to get their current clients on pilots. Pilot season ends around April, and while agents are waiting to hear what pilots will be picked up at the upfronts in May, they are also letting go of clients who didn't do well during pilot season. This could be a good time to get meetings.

After the upfronts in May, writers get hired, as do crew. Pilots that were picked up may be looking to re-cast series regulars. Once episodic season gets going, co-stars, guest stars, and recurring roles are cast regularly. Directors get hired on shows that don't have an exclusive director, and day-playing jobs become available for crew members.

Films shoot all year round. Production reports list films in different stages of development. One way to meet film agents is to attend film festivals where they are searching for talent.

Commercials and Music Videos also shoot all year long and agents know it's a numbers game. Therefore, referrals and buzz campaigns are the best way to get to commercial/MV agents.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Sunday, June 14, 2009

Question 103: When is the best time of year to switch agents? Part 1

Hmmmmm, for those of you who know me, you know I always get suspicious when someone wants to switch agents. Therefore, this is going to be a two-parter. So first a question for you...

Why are you switching? If your answer is:

1. "Because my agent isn't getting me out/interviews," my answer is that there is no "good" time. My reasoning behind this: if your agent isn't getting you out, it may be because you're not marketable enough at the moment. If so, you will most likely have the same experience at what ever agency you land.

2."Because my agent doesn't have enough/the right connections" then research who has the right connections. Be realistic about an agent who does have the connections you want. Are you marketable enough for them to take you on? If so, then they'll be happy to meet with you at any time.

3. "Because I'm at a new level in my career and directors/producers/etc., are telling me I need a bigger agent" Again, anytime is right because when directors and producers are making calls on your behalf, agents are interested.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Saturday, June 13, 2009

question 102: Is the "casting couch" real or an urban legend?

I don't know who sent this because I don't recognize the email address. Therefore, I don't know if this person is serious or not. But, because it is a concern of a lot of people, both male and female, I will answer it seriously.

Sometimes it's literal, and sometimes its metaphorical. Either way, it is an obstacle that some people in the industry encounter. For others, it's an actual career builder. No judgement. There are all different ways of making it in Hollywood and some people choose this course.

If it's not the ladder you want to climb, just say no. It may cost you some opportunities, but many people learn the hard way that even "promises made on the couch" aren't always kept. Make choices you can live with.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Friday, June 12, 2009

Question 101: What is a smart question to ask at an industry Q & A?

Remember that old saying, "There are no stupid questions." Whoever said that, has never been to an entertainment industry Q & A. Okay, I'm being harsh, but it REALLY bothers me when people ask a question like this: "How would someone like me, who has (5 minutes of rambling off his/her credits) get hired by you?"

CLEARLY a resume sharing, job request, masked by a question. Unprofessional, and desperate, in my book.

A smart question, is a question that:

1. You really want the answer to, that establishes the level you're at.

2. Makes you stand out from the crowd (for example if you're at an event where everyone is asking questions about the editing, ask a question about the lighting).

3. Gives the person an opportunity to share a story.

Understand that the purpose of asking a question at a Q&A is two fold. First, you want the answer to further educate yourself. Second, you want to start a relationship, therefore the question will be a reminder of who you are when you follow up with the person.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Question 100: I was top of my field in music photography now i want to get into set photography. How do I do it?

First, I must apologize for FALLING ASLEEP last night before posting question "100." I was so excited that I'd blogged for 100 days straight, and as I sat in my seminar room from 9am - 8pm, I thought about food, sleep, and blog # 100. Unfortunately, I left and did them in that order. Sorry about that. You'll get two today.

Second: answer to today's first question:
The most important thing I can recommend is that you accentuate the positive. Set photography requires specific marketing materials. If you haven't worked on a set shooting stills you need to build your book on whatever projects you can get hired on. Then, be sure to include a few of your most recognizable music photos. You do this because it shows that you've worked around celebrities and know how to handle yourself professionally, that you have the talent to be successful, and the photos make for great conversation starters.

Be sure to have informational interviews so you can learn the similarities and differences between the two industries.

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Question 99: I tried creating rapport like you suggested in Questions 28 & 29 and it felt weird and obvious. What am I doing wrong?

What makes you think you're doing something wrong? 

Did you read # 30? When you're conscious of creating rapport, it feels weird at first, but once you put all of your attention on the other person and really listen, it will happen naturally. I love watching my dogs. I've always had two at a time. No matter what breed they are, they always end up having the same mannerisms. They lay down in the same position, their tails wag in harmony. 

Instead of matching or mirroring the big and obvious, like hand gestures, start with head tilts, facial expressions, speed of speech. Get comfortable with it. By the time you are comfortable, you won't even notice how easily and deeply you naturally go into rapport.  
For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

question 98: I feel stupid approaching a person after they've done a Q&A, but I see others doing it. Should I do it despite how I feel?

I addressed this in Question 71. I can tell you in addition to what I wrote about in that blog, that your feelings are stemming from a lack of objective and preparation.  Of course you would feel stupid if you were walking up there with nothing to say but an insincere compliment. The fact that you're asking this question means you see there is value in creating relationships with people who volunteer their time to give back to the community. So instead of worrying about "feeling" stupid, worry about not "being" stupid.  To do that:

1. Research the person speaking and find a genuine reason to create a relationship

2. Watch the person's work and figure out a genuine reason why this person would make a great mentor

3. Let go of the judgement you're putting on yourself and take a risk

 
For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Monday, June 8, 2009

Question 97: What do I do if I'm in a remote state like Alaska to generate Union work if I'm not in the Union?

Depends on what union. SAG has different rules than IATSE, etc. You may be in a Catch 22 situation where you need union days to get into the union or enough non-union days (which are probably hard to accrue in a remote state). If you're trying to get Union work in Alaska and are not in the Union, there are Union rules that may inhibit you from being hired. After working for a union for 12 years, I can tell you that unions want to help. If the state you're in is remote, maybe there's an opportunity to organize a group of experienced workers and strengthen a union. 

If you live in a place like Alaska, want to work Union and there isn't Union work in your area, you may want to seriously consider relocating. 

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Sunday, June 7, 2009

Question 96: Is it cool if I don't live in LA but have a friend moving out there, to ask my friend who lives there to make my friend feel at home?

Whoa... let me re-read that....

Okay, I think I get it. Yes, it's more than cool. You have a friend who is settled in LA. Ask him or her if you can give your friend his/her number to have someone to show them the ropes.  I've never turned that request down.  I remember how it felt to move out here knowing three people, two of whom left LA within a week of my arrival (the Northridge Earthquake hit 12 hours after my plane touched down). Having someone who can discuss neighborhoods, restaurants, the business, is a huge relief.  

Go for it!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, the Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Saturday, June 6, 2009

Question 95:What if I know people are talking about me at Union Networking events? Should I still go?

Look, this is business, not high school. I have no idea if people are talking about you or not. What I do know is that there are SO many people in this industry that you should ignore the catty group and meet other people. Your union is providing you with the opportunity to do this. Focus on creating strong bonds with new people.    

Pursuing relationships in this industry is like dating. You're not going to connect with everyone and that's okay. The problem is when you only know a few people and you desperately try to force relationships that aren't worth it. Find the like-minded people and surround yourself with people who uplift and inspire you! 

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Question 94: How should I dress for an interview with an agent?

"Dress the part." This is not an interview for corporate America. I recently coached a beautiful young girl who'd had a terrible meeting with a commercial agent. She had a meeting with a second one and wanted better results. I asked her what she thought went wrong. The biggest problem she felt, was that she wore a dressy dress, and for the next one, planned to wear a pencil skirt (corporate look). I told her NO WAY! Dress the way you will be cast. She's right for Sprite, cell phones, and everything young and hip. So she wore a cute polka dotted sundress, and Viola, the second agent wanted to sign her on the spot.

Know your signature look/style and brand it in your appearance as well as your art. If you're an "academic" cinematographer, wear your glasses and a sport coat- not a suit and tie. If you're an "imaginative" production designer, be creative and colorful with your clothes. If you're a hip and trendy costume designer, you better dress hip and trendy. 

Your personal brand is reflected in everything from how you dress to the cover on your DVD reel. It should all reflect your art. I work from home in a plush and comfy bathrobe, but I'm certainly not going to be cast that way, so I suck it up and put on the Va Va Va Voom clothes when I have a meeting. Yup, the Uggs have to stay at home and the high heeled boots hit the pavement. That's entertainment!

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, the Greenlight Coach, visit www.thegreenlightcoachblog.com    
 

Thursday, June 4, 2009

Question 93: What do I do when I have to work and "life" shows up?

Okay, I'll be honest. This wasn't one of your questions. This is what I've been asking myself all day. At 9:20am, this morning, five minutes before I was supposed to leave to give a seminar for The Actors Fund of America, my 13-year-old Lab had what appeared to be a stroke. I was rushed, confused and torn. I knew I had a group of 70+ waiting for me, but my dog is like my child.

What do I do when I have to work and "life" shows up?

You make choices. Sometimes hard choices. I called my sister, who works across the street, and had her come home and get him so she could bring him to the vet. I told her I'd be turning my phone off, because I couldn't hear any bad news before going on-stage. Once I made the choice, I committed to it, and gave my audience 100%. 

When it was over, I called my sister. I got the update on Jake. It was not a stoke, but he was not out-of the woods. I had a new client to meet. I gave him 100%. I left him, called my sister, she was on her way to the vet and wanted me to meet her. I explained I was driving home for another client, and would come over after. I gave my next client 100%. THEN I went to the vet to be with my boy.  There was nothing I could do for him during the course of the day that my sister couldn't handle. 

What do I do when I have to work and "life" shows up?
1. Make a quick evaluation of the choices
2. Ask for help
3. Use my tools, to be "in the moment" with whatever choice I make
4. Forgive myself for any uncertainty about the decision I made

He's still at the vet who is optimistic. I'll know more tomorrow. 

What do I do when I have to work and "life" shows up? The very best that I can. And that's all you can do. 

Wednesday, June 3, 2009

Question 92: You've got your own business, do you ever think of just quitting the "biz"?

Are you asking because you're thinking about quitting the biz? I have quit...  3 times, and to quote Michael Corleone, "Just when I thought I was out... they pull me back in."  

Do I have days when I wonder what am I doing in this crazy business? Yes. Do I have days when I feel alone, frustrated, confused, and hopeless? Yes.  

And then I remember the first movie I did on location in Oregon, where I saw my first wild peacock, elk on the side of the road, failed at cattle wrangling, rode a horse even though I was told I wouldn't have to since it WASN'T on my special skills, AND I got to act ever day (but 4) for one whole month.   

And then I remember starring in a sitcom pilot where a Camera Operator from Mad About You, told me we'd never get the whole pilot shot in ten hours. He was right... we shot it in 8. He was shocked, all of the actors knew our lines.

And then I remember a reality show from MTV following around a television show I was on and being on a treadmill at the gym and seeing myself on MTV and having the guy next to me stare at the TV and then look at me and then back at the TV and then back at me.

I love acting, I love writing, I love being on set with creative people, I love watching the finished product, and I love the memories that pull me out of the down times. 

Create your own memories, and cherish them. This industry isn't for everyone, but if you want to stick with it and presently it's hurting your soul, tap into the memories of why you love it, then imagine it's five years from now and you're doing what you love. Really immerse yourself in the visualization; the sights, sounds, scents, tastes, feelings. Those feelings are are just as real in your body as the sad, lonely, rejected feelings. The difference is your choice of what you focus on. 

I'm going to go visualize the web-series I've been acting in becoming a network show... happy thoughts to you all...

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.thegreenlightcoachblog.com 

Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Question 91: Is the business always this slow?

I think I've heard that question every month for the last 10 years. I guess it's because as a coach, half of the people who come to me are out of work. So it can be the busiest time ever and for the out of work people, it still feels slow.

The entertainment industry is ever-changing. With strikes, de-facto strikes, run-away production, tax incentive states, right-to-work states, changing technology, expensive equipment, in-expensive equipment, people retiring, new people entering the industry, and on and on...

Is the business slow? Who knows. It is what it is. If there is someone, anyone, out there working, you can be too. Instead of looking for an excuse like "its slow" to allow yourself off the hook or blame for your being out of work,  ask yourself, what can I be doing to generate work for myself no matter what the state of the industry?

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.theGreenlightCoachBlog.com 

Monday, June 1, 2009

Question 90: Is doing a reality show an "in" for an actress?

Ooooooo that's a toughy. It depends on so many things: what kind of career you want, what kind of reality show, how you're edited on that show, the relationships you develop while doing that show.

Like most opportunities, it's all relative. Jacinda Barrett, from the Real World has been building a legitimate theatrical career. Yet, hundreds of other people who've done reality have never worked theatrically.  Some have done guest appearances on television shows, either as a character or as themselves. I've caught a few doing commercials. Some comedians have shows that I love, like Mike Rowe on Dirty Jobs. Still others have made a career of going from reality show to reality show. A few "train-wrecks" have even had shows created around them. 

You've got to know the tone of the show. There's a difference between doing "the Apprentice" and doing "Bret Michael's Rock of Love." 

My final question is why do you want to act? Do you just want the fame? And if so, do you just want 15 minutes of it? 

For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com