BE ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

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Thursday, May 16, 2013

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1280: I grew up in India and as a result English is my second language (cont'd)


"I grew up in India and as a result English is my second language. I am looking to improve my comprehension when I read my text books or watch movies, I feel I can understand parts of everything but am left to connect the dots myself - which obviously makes it difficult to have a long conversation. And a lot of times I see my self uselessly nodding even when I am not able to grasp everything that is being said. If you have any pointers that can help me I would really appreciate it."
Here is my answer:

If it makes you feel any better, I've been in many conversations where people are just nodded their head not grasping everything, and English is their first language :-)

That said, improving your comprehension as you're doing is a great start. In addition, you can do a few things. 

1. Write down the topic of discussion or a specific word to research later. I do this when I'm talking with people in other industries who bring me in to speak and I have no idea what they are talking about in regards to specifics in their industry. I do nod my head like you, but I do it to create rapport, knowing later I will look up the subjects they were discussing. 

2. You can ask a question for clarification. Be loud and proud of where you come from and say, "I'm from India, so English is my second language. I'm fascinated by what you're talking about, so can you clarify what you mean by _____ because it's not translating for me." 

3. Listen carefully. I'm sure you think you're already doing that, yet sometimes, when you "notice" that you're not comprehending, you start to have thoughts "narrating" what you're experiencing" so you don't hear everything that is being said. For example a narration might be... "What did he just say? I don't understand that. This is so frustrating. I wish I understood English better" and the thoughts keep coming and all of a sudden you've missed 30 seconds of what was said making it even more confusing. 

Hope these tips help. And know that it will continue to get easier. 



For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visit www.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com

To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do! 

Friday, January 11, 2013

Getting Jobs in Entertainment question 1279: do you think having a weird hair color is hurtful and limiting or is beneficial and makes you stand out as an actor?

It is both. Having a weird hair color makes you a character. If a Casting Director is looking for a young mom for a Tide commercial, he won't be calling in a young mom with purple hair. However, having a weird hair color makes you stand our for parts that call for the type of person that has weird hair color. So if the next day that same Casting Director gets a a Coke commercial that calls for hipsters, he will call in people with weird hair, tattoos, and piercings.

You can look at it as everyone is "limited" to their type. The questions you want to research are:
1. How many people am I competing against with weird colored hair?
2. How many casting calls am I seeing for people with weird colored hair?
3. How many roles do I see on TV or in films with people my age/gender with weird colored hair?

Then you can decide if you want to go with the permanent color, or the trendy wash outs.

Bottom line is, you want to feel true to yourself and confident when you are auditioning. If your headshots are captivating, you could get called in for a role that didn't call for weird colored hair, just because the Casting Director wants to see your take on the character.


For more tips and articles by top entertainment industry career coach, The Greenlight Coach, visitwww.TheGreenlightCoachBlog.com
To stay current on The Greenlight Coach's speaking engagements, recommendations, and work success articles, sign up for her free newsletter at the top of the page and get a great bonus 1-hour MP3 on creating powerful business partnerships when you do!